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Welcome to Rapport, containing tips, truths, news and views, blogs, tweets, articles and films covering a range of topics currently affecting Research Partnership and the pharma market research world
  • Posted by Paul Reed
  • October 1, 2018
  • Articles

Dónde estoy, onde estou, où suis-je, where am I?

Dónde estoy, onde estou, où suis-je, where am I?

Defining the regions of Latin America and the Caribbean

Although we have conducted a lot of research studies in Latin America and the Caribbean, we couldn’t, as a team, agree exactly what defines this region and its boundaries for our clients. This is because our clients structure their LATC divisions in different ways. They often decide how to structure themselves based on where the best talent is located within the region and then balance that against proximity to strategic regions and US offices.  As a result LATC operational teams vary by organisation. There is no standard blue print.

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  • Posted by Marc Yates
  • February 27, 2018
  • Articles

Good intentions, bad habits: Reforming mental healthcare in Latin America and the Caribbean

Good intentions, bad habits: Reforming mental healthcare in Latin America and the Caribbean

Published in eyeforpharma April 2018 by Marc Yates

The Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region is a vast patchwork of countries, cultures and ethnicities, with a total population of more than 645 million, ranging from 209 million-plus in Brazil to islands with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants. The diversity is also economic. Recent years have seen marked improvements in income distribution and a burgeoning middle class, particularly in countries such as Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru and Nicaragua. Yet Latin America and the Caribbean remains the region with the highest levels of income inequality worldwide.  All of this has a significant bearing on the state of mental health in Latin America, where good intentions and genuine progress in reforming infrastructure and attitudes are clouded by treatment gaps, inadequate funding, over-centralisation, meagre human resources and persistent stigmatisation.

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