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Welcome to Rapport, containing tips, truths, news and views, blogs, tweets, articles and films covering a range of topics currently affecting Research Partnership and the pharma market research world
  • Posted by Harrison Gaiger
  • September 29, 2020
  • Articles

Fake news pandemic: The rise of healthcare misinformation in the age of COVID-19

Fake news pandemic: The rise of healthcare misinformation in the age of COVID-19

Harrison Gaiger explores the Coronavirus myths and mistruths that have flooded social media and the human cost of healthcare misinformation.

In February of this year, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) warned of a wave of false information that would impede an effective public health response to COVID-19 and create confusion and distrust among people all over the world. He claimed that we were not just fighting an epidemic but also an ‘infodemic’ – an abundance of information, some accurate some not, that would spread faster and more easily than the virus, making it difficult to identify what is true and what is false. It was just a few weeks later that Dr Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced to the world that the COVID-19 outbreak could be characterised as a global pandemic. With almost no country in the world unaffected, and with fear for the future increasing, the wave of misinformation he warned us about was in danger of becoming a tsunami.

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  • Posted by Mariel Metcalfe
  • September 23, 2020
  • Articles

Inhale, Exhale: The struggle of living with Severe Asthma and Severe Eosinophilic Asthma

Inhale, Exhale: The struggle of living with Severe Asthma and Severe Eosinophilic Asthma

Head of “Living With”, Mariel Metcalfe, discusses the nature of severe asthma and severe eosinophilic asthma, and some key findings from recent studies conducted in Europe, USA and Japan. Published in pharmaphorum.

Most people know that asthma is a chronic long-term respiratory condition in which the lung’s airways become inflamed and narrowed, making it difficult for sufferers to breathe. It is also known that asthma causes wheezing and triggers a tightness in the chest. Medical researchers have identified that there are different types of asthma, and they respond differently to treatment. Severe asthma (SA) affects 15% of asthma suffers and usually appears in adults. Severe eosinophilic asthma (SEA) is rare and affects 40% of SA sufferers. 

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  • Posted by Pei Li Teh
  • September 22, 2020
  • Articles

Developing Biosimilars in Asia

Developing Biosimilars in Asia

Biologics currently make up half of the pharmacological market for oncology, but the steep cost of these drugs is a barrier to access globally.

In 3 years’ time, patents on nearly 20 oncology biologics will expire, which is likely to result in the launch of biosimilars offering reduced prices. In the past, the biosimilars market was focused in Europe and the US. However, biosimilars have recently begun to emerge in countries with existing biopharmaceutical infrastructure and companies.

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Has the reality of virtual conferences lived up to their promise?

Has the reality of virtual conferences lived up to their promise?

Using findings from a recent poll conducted among Oncologists, Harrison Gaiger explores what they really thought of ASCO 2020 and discusses the the changing nature of medical conferences.

In March, much of the world went in to lockdown and the prospect of medical conferences running as normal became unimaginable. Seeing no alternative, many organisers who would have spent months meticulously planning their upcoming events made the difficult decision to cancel. The more optimistic among them opted to postpone until 2021, while some deferred indefinitely. However, among the flurry of cancellations and postponements, some professional bodies and event organisers saw an opportunity to go a different route. As the old saying goes, “Necessity is the mother of invention”.

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  • Posted by Dan Coffin
  • August 21, 2020
  • Articles

Why pharma must trust the science of behaviour

Why pharma must trust the science of behaviour

In a recent interview with PME Magazine, Dan Coffin explained why the application of behavioural science will be key to better health far beyond COVID-19.

Last month, as the world began to tiptoe its way out of lockdown, a Sky News anchor declared that COVID-19 had ‘exposed behavioural science’ as ‘a load of nonsense’. The rationale? That behavioural scientists’ influence over the UK government’s COVID response caused a delay in lockdown that cost thousands of lives. The scientists’ logic was that if restrictions were imposed too early, ‘behavioural fatigue’ would soon set in and people might sleepwalk back into dangerous habits before the pandemic had peaked. Increases in road traffic that began three weeks into lockdown suggest the thinking had some merit. But the subsequent death toll – and hindsight – tell a different story. Today, months into a crisis where we’re consistently told to ‘trust the science’, the science of behaviour is under the microscope. However, to debate behavioural theory solely through the lens of the coronavirus – using death as the guiding metric – is to minimise its value. Human behaviour is complex, but understanding what drives it – and designing communications that encourage people to do things differently – is key to facilitating positive change. Dismissing behavioural science as blather – a bitter irony in Sky News’ case, given the broadcaster’s mastery of conscious bias…

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