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Welcome to Rapport, containing tips, truths, news and views, blogs, tweets, articles and films covering a range of topics currently affecting Research Partnership and the pharma market research world.

Are dual ARVs the new frontier in a maturing HIV market?

Are dual ARVs the new frontier in a maturing HIV market?

Tackling and managing HIV has been one of the pharmaceutical industry’s more distinguished achievements, despite the turbulence and antagonism that marked the early days of AIDS-related R&D and the industry’s relationships with governments, patients and activists.

Therapy Watch Associate Director Raquel Nuñez, discusses continuing improvements in HIV therapies and the evolution of single-tablet regimens (STRs) over time.

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  • Posted by Richard Head, Claire Richardson, Mariel Metcalfe
  • November 30, 2017
  • White papers

Patient centricity: Reality or rhetoric?

Patient centricity: Reality or rhetoric?

Everybody is talking about patient centricity, but what does it mean for those involved in market research, insights and business intelligence?

The term has certainly begun to filter through to the pharmaceutical market research industry. It was a hot topic at EphMRA conference in 2017, with a number of presentations from agencies, including some innovative new research offerings.

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Punching above your weight: Combining behavioural and attitudinal data to strengthen segmentations

Punching above your weight: Combining behavioural and attitudinal data to strengthen segmentations

In this paper we examine the differences between behavioural and attitudinal approaches to segmentation and outline how integration of the two can best be achieved to strengthen segmentation solutions

Segmentation solutions in healthcare are experiencing a welcome comeback. But there appear to be two camps emerging - one camp are proponents of the 'behavioural' segmentation based on secondary sales, script or similar data; the other believe that 'attitudinal' segmentations must be based on primary market research to accurately delineate segment membership, definition and the "whys" that underpin the findings. It's time to take off the gloves and look at the argument from both sides.

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South Korea: The next global player?

South Korea: The next global player?

In this paper, we will explore some of the key trends and outlooks for South Korea in more detail, including what lies behind its presence at the extremes of two conflicting global health indicators: longest life expectancy and highest suicide rates.

Over the past two decades South Korea has experienced rapid economic growth. Low unemployment, rising incomes and increased health insurance coverage have all contributed to the development of a robust healthcare sector and catalysed pharmaceutical sales. South Korea is currently the 13th largest pharmaceutical market in the world and the third largest in Asia, with predicted compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 2.4%. increasing from US$18.6 billion in 2016 to US$20.4 billion by 2020.

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Will gene therapies finally be commercially viable to pharma?

Will gene therapies finally be commercially viable to pharma?

Our latest Free Thinking white paper explores the science behind the idea of gene therapy and takes a look at some of the core challenges medical researchers have faced when attempting to develop this technology. We review gene therapy’s chequered past, look at recent developments in this field and consider the future for gene therapies on their way to market.

Genes are segments of DNA which code instructions for your cells to make proteins. Many inherited disorders are a result of faulty genes which encode incorrect instructions for making specific proteins, either the proteins themselves are defective or the gene may have faulty expression which can result in over-expression so over-production of a certain kind of protein. In the case of cancer, there can be multiple external and internal factors which lead to production of genetically mutated cancerous cells.

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